Better to be an alive atheist than a dead Christian (Joey’s story)

Today I’m featuring a guest post from my friend Jessy Briton Hamilton, about his friend Joey and his experience being shunned by the church for his sexual orientation.  Shortly after reading Joey’s story, I saw Julie Rodgers’ post describing her experience of rejection. It astounds me that some traditionalists were not more supportive of Julie, if what they say about holding their convictions with love … Continue reading Better to be an alive atheist than a dead Christian (Joey’s story)

Why Russell Moore is right: racial injustice IS a gospel issue

I worry a bit when we start labeling ever divisive matter a “gospel issue.” Surely not everything rises to this threshold. Surely if you play the “gospel” card too many times—if you argue that “the gospel is at stake” in practically every debate—pretty soon the word loses all meaning. It becomes little more than a rhetorical club for stifling debate, for … Continue reading Why Russell Moore is right: racial injustice IS a gospel issue

What an atheist’s crucifix taught my child about faith

It was a crucifix that caught my daughter’s eye during ArtPrize this year. There’s no shortage of crucifixes to be found at the annual art competition. From the 2011 popular vote winner, depicting a bored looking, white American Jesus backlit by a Kinkade-esque sunset, to one of this year’s installations, “The Moment, Endured,” a more … Continue reading What an atheist’s crucifix taught my child about faith

Polarization and the church: is a third way possible?

Last week, the Pew Research Center shared their findings from a 20-year study of polarization in American politics. The short version: it’s getting worse. But polarization is not just a political phenomenon. It’s a religious one too. Polarization is more than just disagreement with someone. It’s the tendency to view that person as your enemy, … Continue reading Polarization and the church: is a third way possible?

Retributive violence is still violence, even when it’s a slushie

Nonretaliation and enemy-love are not some insignificant whisper lingering on the edge of Jesus’ ethical landscape. They are fundamental identity markers for citizens of God’s kingdom. — Preston Sprinkle, Fight It can be argued that Christine Weick committed an act of violence when she spent Mother’s Day camped at a busy intersection in suburban Grand Rapids with her … Continue reading Retributive violence is still violence, even when it’s a slushie

When the dreams you had for your kids fall apart

Lately I’ve been reading the stories of parents whose children came out of the closet. When James Brownson’s 18-year-old son told his parents he was gay, it prompted a five-year period of reflection and study (Brownson is a New Testament scholar), culminating in the book Bible Gender Sexuality. Elsewhere, an anonymous evangelical pastor shared his story … Continue reading When the dreams you had for your kids fall apart

4 things you should consider about World Vision’s policy change

Update: Since this post was first published, World Vision has reversed their decision to allow people in same-sex marriages to work there. As the debate continues over the announcement that World Vision will no longer fire someone for being in a same-sex marriage, here are a few things I’d like to share for your consideration. I … Continue reading 4 things you should consider about World Vision’s policy change

The patriarch and the pope: the real difference between Phil Robertson and Pope Francis

By now, enough has been said about Duck Dynasty to make Sir Tim Berners-Lee sorry he invented the Internet. Kristen Howerton of Rage Against the Minivan shared what I felt was the best response so far. Also worth considering: a valid question from Time about A&E’s suspension of Phil Robertson and this Atlantic piece arguing the … Continue reading The patriarch and the pope: the real difference between Phil Robertson and Pope Francis

Listening to other voices: it won’t just happen by accident

There was a time, even after I had embraced gender equality, when most of the voices I listened to — theologians, bloggers, etc. — were men. I don’t think I planned it that way. But years of believing that only men could talk authoritatively about the Bible had conditioned me to tune out female voices. Even after … Continue reading Listening to other voices: it won’t just happen by accident